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Politics
LCOOU president opens summit with a vision to thrive, prosper

"If you have love in your heart, stand up," said Dr. Russell Swagger, president of Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe University (LCOOU) on Thursday morning, Sept. 29 at the James "Pipe" Mustache Auditorium.

President Swagger's request began his opening introductory remarks at the second day of the three-day, Sept. 28-30, Seven Generations Inter-tribal Leadership Summit Innovation in Education program held at LCCOOU.

The summit was held in partnership with the College of Menominee Nation and University of Wisconsin System.

The purpose of the summit was to "provide a forum for tribal leadership, educators, students, elders and community member to learn from educators and industry professional in four areas: education/technology/culture reclamation; economic workforce development; health/medicine/safety and environment: research, protection, policy/legislation."


CRANBERRY CRATE RACE WINNER

Zoology
Bringing up beagles: A new home, a new world to explore

On Saturday, Aug. 27, my husband Vaughan and I picked up two five-and-a-half-month-old beagle puppies from the Northwoods Humane Society, a process I described the last time I wrote.

We christened them Liza and Lorna, filled out our paperwork, and as foster parents were given everything we'd need to care for them — two dog crates, food, beds, leashes and harnesses.

They rode home in their crates and there wasn't a peep out of them all the way home.

It took some coaxing to get them out of their crates, but beagles are very docile. When we picked either of them up, they would just go limp in our arms.

Vaughan took Lorna, I took Liza, and we explored the yard.

The dogs' first exposure to grass and sky had been, I believe, two days earlier at the humane society. We'd been warned that lab dogs don't necessarily take well to the outdoors, but this wasn't the case with the girls. The beagle's legendary sense of smell was immediately evident. They took it all in, and the more they smelled, the faster they moved. The faster they moved, the more their tails wagged. But they were always conscious of where we were and stayed close.

Our yard is perfect for dogs. We're off the road a ways with a good buffer of trees. The yard just around our house is a wide and open grassy area, bordered by trees on three sides and our neighbor's yard on the other.

We realized it wasn't going to be easy to tell them apart, and yet there were plenty of differences. Liza's ears usually hang limp — Vaughan compares her to JarJar Binks from Star Wars — and Lorna's are perkier. Liza was always more cautious, Lorna more adventurous. The only real physical difference is the big patch of freckles on Liza's nose.

They seemed somewhat physically awkward. When they ran it was kind of slow and loping. Our yard is sloped and sometimes they seemed to accidentally roll down the hills.

When it came time to explore the house, no amount of coaxing would get them inside, so we picked them up to bring them in. When I reached for Liza she crouched submissively and a little puddle of pee spread on the sidewalk behind her. This would be an ongoing issue.

We had a crate set up in the dining room, just off the kitchen, and they each took a turn walking into it, turning around, and coming out.

Maybe this wouldn't be too tough.

Vaughan had to head to work, so I took them back outside, always worrying about where they would go to the bathroom.

Pee and poop would now become the two biggest issues in my life. We went to explore our gravel pit, and I was amazed at how instinct just kicks in with animals.

These dogs had spent every minute of their five months indoors, yet they seemed perfectly at home exploring the outdoors.

They seemed to love rocks, of all things, and constantly found new favorites to chew and carry around for a bit. Lorna discovered how much fun it is to slide down piles of sand.

After the gravel pit, we walked through our meadow and took a short hike through the woods. They took it all in but never left each other's sides, walking so close that their sides were touching.

When Vaughan got home from work the dogs had their first at-home baths. I bathed Liza and she didn't protest much.

Vaughan took Lorna, and that was a different story. As I was drying Liza I heard Vaughan laughing in the bathroom. I opened the door and Lorna was clawing her way up onto Vaughan's shoulders. She got her bath, but by the time it was over Vaughan was more soaked than she was.

When it came time to go to bed, we put them in their crate, said good night, and braced ourselves for a night of whining.

There wasn't a peep out of them. Content together, they slept quietly until we took them out at 3 a.m. When we brought them back in, they went right back to sleep and a sound until we let them out at 7 a.m.

Had we won the dog lottery?

The next day they had company for the first time when our sister-in-law Kate, niece Ellen and her boyfriend Tristan came to visit. Kate walked into the room and Liza barked for the first time. She even growled a little bit. But the girls warmed up quickly and were playing in no time.

Our first couple days with them were fun but uneventful. There were no accidents in the house and so far they'd only chewed on things they were supposed to chew on.

As far as Vaughan and I were concerned, so far this was a lot of fun. They made us laugh a lot; they were fun to watch, and they kept us on our toes. Constantly.

They were just two fairly normal, super sweet puppies.

There was no drama. But that was soon to change.

It took some coaxing to get them out of their crates, but beagles are very docile. When we picked either of them up, they would just go limp in our arms.

Vaughan took Lorna, I took Liza, and we explored the yard.

The dogs' first exposure to grass and sky had been, I believe, two days earlier at the humane society. We'd been warned that lab dogs don't necessarily take well to the outdoors, but this wasn't the case with the girls. The beagle's legendary sense of smell was immediately evident. They took it all in, and the more they smelled, the faster they moved. The faster they moved, the more their tails wagged. But they were always conscious of where we were and stayed close.

Our yard is perfect for dogs. We're off the road a ways with a good buffer of trees. The yard just around our house is a wide and open grassy area, bordered by trees on three sides and our neighbor's yard on the other.

We realized it wasn't going to be easy to tell them apart, and yet there were plenty of differences. Liza's ears usually hang limp — Vaughan compares her to JarJar Binks from Star Wars — and Lorna's are perkier. Liza was always more cautious, Lorna more adventurous. The only real physical difference is the big patch of freckles on Liza's nose.

They seemed somewhat physically awkward. When they ran it was kind of slow and loping. Our yard is sloped and sometimes they seemed to accidentally roll down the hills.

When it came time to explore the house, no amount of coaxing would get them inside, so we picked them up to bring them in. When I reached for Liza she crouched submissively and a little puddle of pee spread on the sidewalk behind her. This would be an ongoing issue.

We had a crate set up in the dining room, just off the kitchen, and they each took a turn walking into it, turning around, and coming out.

Maybe this wouldn't be too tough.

Vaughan had to head to work, so I took them back outside, always worrying about where they would go to the bathroom.

Pee and poop would now become the two biggest issues in my life.

We went to explore our gravel pit, and I was amazed at how instinct just kicks in with animals.

These dogs had spent every minute of their five months indoors, yet they seemed perfectly at home exploring the outdoors.

They seemed to love rocks, of all things, and constantly found new favorites to chew and carry around for a bit. Lorna discovered how much fun it is to slide down piles of sand.

After the gravel pit, we walked through our meadow and took a short hike through the woods. They took it all in but never left each other's sides, walking so close that their sides were touching.

When Vaughan got home from work the dogs had their first at-home baths. I bathed Liza and she didn't protest much.

Vaughan took Lorna, and that was a different story. As I was drying Liza I heard Vaughan laughing in the bathroom. I opened the door and Lorna was clawing her way up onto Vaughan's shoulders. She got her bath, but by the time it was over Vaughan was more soaked than she was.

When it came time to go to bed, we put them in their crate, said good night, and braced ourselves for a night of whining.

There wasn't a peep out of them. Content together, they slept quietly until we took them out at 3 a.m. When we brought them back in, they went right back to sleep and a sound until we let them out at 7 a.m.

Had we won the dog lottery?

The next day they had company for the first time when our sister-in-law Kate, niece Ellen and her boyfriend Tristan came to visit. Kate walked into the room and Liza barked for the first time. She even growled a little bit. But the girls warmed up quickly and were playing in no time.

Our first couple days with them were fun but uneventful. There were no accidents in the house and so far they'd only chewed on things they were supposed to chew on.

As far as Vaughan and I were concerned, so far this was a lot of fun. They made us laugh a lot; they were fun to watch, and they kept us on our toes. Constantly.

They were just two fairly normal, super sweet puppies.

There was no drama. But that was soon to change.


School
HHS Ojibwe language students observe Day of Remembrance

Students in the Ojibwe Language and Culture Class at Hayward High School and their teacher, Ogimaabinesiikwe (Lisa Clemens), observed the National Day of Remembrance for Indian Boarding School victims and survivors Friday, Sept. 30.

Ogimaabinesiikwe said that "September 30th has been declared Orange Shirt Day annually, in recognition of the harm the residential school system did to children's sense of self-esteem and well being, and as an affirmation of our commitment to ensure that everyone around us matters." The day is observed by indigenous nations in the U.S. and Canada.

She said that many school staff were unaware of the history of Indian boarding schools. She prepared a slide show for the class to create awareness and also made it available to staff.

Students in Clemens' class marked a section of the high school track fence with orange ribbons in the shape of a heart. They put down tobacco and had a feast.

Also, an orange ribbon table was set up in the high school commons with laminated historical articles and photos of Indian boarding schools, including the school and farm that was operated by the U.S. government in Hayward (where the hospital is now) from 1901 to 1932. Local Lac Courte Oreilles tribal members as well as other Native children ages four to 16 from Wisconsin and Minnesota were forced to attend that school.

The compulsory attendance law was passed in 1891, which enabled federal officers to forcibly take Native American children from their homes on reservations and place them in the boarding schools.

Upon learning this, students in Clemens' class expressed their reactions with emojis including "angry," "anxious," "confused" and "curious."

The boarding schools were overcrowded and underfunded. "There was a lot of sickness, tuberculosis and measles, going on," Clemens said. "Many of the students never returned home after being taken to the boarding schools.

"There also were all forms of abuse. The language and culture were stripped. In the late 1800s there was a widely-shared idea that Indians were not civilized and that's why children were removed from their homes."

She added that "some of the kids today are finding out from their families that an auntie or grandparent was in a boarding school, but it isn't something that's discussed."A class member said that's because "It's a traumatic event. If they'd talk about it, they feel like it's reliving the event, so they never want to talk about it."

Clemens said the Canadian government is the only country that has made a public apology for the boarding school era. People have to go to court and testify about their experiences in order to receive a settlement.

She added that "When we talk about it, it's a pretty solemn, quiet classroom."

There are about 48 students in the Hayward High School Ojibwe language and culture classes. They use the Rosetta Stone language curriculum developed through the Mille Lacs reservation.

Students in the Ojibwe Language and Culture Class at Hayward High School and their teacher, Ogimaabinesiikwe (Lisa Clemens), observed the National Day of Remembrance for Indian Boarding School victims and survivors

Ogimaabinesiikwe said that "September 30th has been declared Orange Shirt Day annually, in recognition of the harm the residential school system did to children's sense of self-esteem and well being, and as an affirmation of our commitment to ensure that everyone around us matters." The day is observed by indigenous nations in the U.S. and Canada.

She said that many school staff were unaware of the history of Indian boarding schools. She prepared a slide show for her class to create awareness and also made it available to staff.

Students in Clemens' class marked a section of the high school track fence with orange ribbons in the shape of a heart. They put down tobacco and had a feast.

Also, an orange ribbon table was set up in the high school commons with laminated historical articles and photos of Indian boarding schools, including the one that was operated by the U.S. government in Hayward (where the hospital is now) from 1901 to 1932. Local tribal members as well as other Native children ages four to 16 from Wisconsin and Minnesota were forced to attend that school.

The compulsory attendance law was passed in 1891, which enabled federal officers to forcibly take Native American children from their homes on reservations and place them in

Upon learning this, students in Clemens' class expressed their reactions with emojis including "angry," "anxious," "confused" and "curious."

The boarding schools were overcrowded and underfunded. "There was a lot of sickness, tuberculosis and measles, going on," Clemens said. "Many of the students never returned home after being taken to the boarding schools.

"There also were all forms of abuse. The language and culture were stripped. In the late 1800s there was a widely-shared idea that Indians were not civilized and that's why children were removed from their homes."

She added that "some of the kids today are finding out from their families that an auntie or grandparent was in a boarding school, but it isn't something that's discussed."

A class member said that's because "It's a traumatic event. If they'd talk about it, they feel like it's reliving the event, so they never want to talk about it."

Clemens said the Canadian government is the only country that has made a public apology for the boarding school era. People have to go to court and testify about their experiences in order to receive a settlement.

She added that "When we alk about it, it's a pretty solmn, quiet classroom."

There are about 48 students in the Hayward High School Ojibwe language and culture classes. They use the Rosetta Stone language curriculum developed through the Mille Lacs reservation.


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