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Broadcasting_events
Haywardites to appear with world-famous TV chef Sunday

Two persons with Hayward roots will be appearing on national television with a world famous chef, restaurateur and TV personality this upcoming Monday, June 13.

Tina Scheer and Thomas Lancaster will join Gordon Ramsay in National Geographic's, Nat Geo, series "Gordon Ramsay: Uncharted" in an episode titled "Maine Ingredient."

Ramsay is the star of such cable shows as "Hell's Kitchen," "Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares," "Kitchen Nightmares," "MasterChef" and "MasterChef Junior," as well as "Hotel Hell" and "24 Hours to Hell and Back."

Besides being all over cable television, scenes from his shows pop over social media, usually with Ramsay painfully grimacing after sampling an unsatisfying entree and then loudly questioning the head chef skills and inevitably rummaging through the cold storage snorting several obscenities while uncovering slimy chicken parts stored in a plastic container under the remains of last month's special.

From a safe digital distance, Ramsay is fun to watch, but in person he's a possible painful wakeup call to one's ego, but Scheer said she had just the opposite experience.

"I though he was really genuinely nice," she said. "He was very interested in my business and how I got started."

For 26 seasons, Scheer has operated Timber Tina's Great Main Lumberjack Show from Trenton, Maine, just blocks from Bar Harbor near Acadia National Park.

"This area is just like Wisconsin but a mile away you have the Atlantic Ocean," she said.

Scheer's show features all the traditional lumberjack skills, such as crosscut sawing, chopping, log rolling and climbing — just like her brother Fred holds in Hayward by the Lumberjack Bowl, and her other brother, Robert, does from Ketchikan, Alaska.

Last summer, Ramsay was in Maine shooting for an episode for Season 3 when Scheer was contacted.

"He had been out lobstering or clamming with local people and he came to me to get firewood to cook on the beach," she said.

"Uncharted" features Ramsay traveling around the world, soaking a little bit of the local culture while exploring local foods and local dishes. The show is similar to Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservation" and "Parts Unknown," but one big difference is Ramsay prepares his version of local entrees while Bourdain just tasted and opined.

Sheer convinced the cable show that Ramsay should visit her business and learn some lumberjack skills.

"I started showing Gordon how to throw the axe," she said, "and then I told the producer that I'd love to show him how to crosscut saw, and I asked if I could bring in some others to demonstrate."

The producers chose athletic-looking Lancaster, who later convinced Ramsay to put on some climbing gear and try pole climbing.

"I also taught him how to use a hot saw, chain saw, and we raced but he complained I had an advantage with my modified saw," she said.

Scheer said Ramsay didn't show that notorious, confrontational TV temper peppered with the unprintables he's known for.

"He was delightful," she said. "We were working together in the forest and he just thought it was great. He was not at all what he is like on 'Hell's Kitchen.'"

This is not Scheer's first appearance on national television. In 2013 she was in a different Nat Geo series "Ultimate Survival: Alaska" where she had to live in the wilderness with only the items she carried in on her back. In 2006 she appeared in one episode of CBS's "Survivor: Panama."

With their appearance on "Gordon Ramsay: Uncharted," Scheer and Lancaster are the second and third persons with ties to the area who have appeared on a national, cable food-theme show.

Heather Ludzack, owner and chef for the Brick House in Cable, has made four appearances on the Food Network with another famous chef and TV personality Guy Fieri. In 2014 she was on "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives," and then three subsequent episodes of "Grocery Games," also with Fieri, including one shot last December.

And talk about coincidence, Scheer and Ludzack are also friends and Scheer is a Hayward High School classmate of Ludzack's husband.

"Heather and I are buds," she said.


Tourism
COOLING OFF

Borah Epic rider Anna Ganju of New Berlin, Wis., cools off in the 90-degree heat with water sprayed by Charlie Munich at the 38-mile bike race's halfway point at the Samuel C. Johnson touring center Saturday, June 5. The water and energy drink station was operated by Hayward Boy Scouts and Hayward Area Memorial Hospital staff.


Highway
Highway 53/63 intersection under major construction
Temporary stoplights to be added June 14

Visitors to Sawyer County traveling from the south and west and local residents traveling to the west or south through Washburn County will experience a major twoyear, $17.7 million construction project occurring at the Highway 53-63 intersection in the Town of Trego.

In the planning stages for more than 10 years, the project is part of the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) effort to convert Highway 53 from an expressway (with at-grade access) to a freeway, with entrance and exits only off an interchange.

The project also will improve safety, and should resolve traffic backups during the busy summer months. Safety will be enhanced by eliminating the dangerous intersection of two heavily traveled roadways — Highway 53 and Highway 63 — and a busy county roadway, Washburn County Highway E.

The area has been the site of several tragic accidents over the years as vehicles departing from stop signs at Highway E and Highway 63 have driven into the fast-moving northbound or southbound traffic on Highway 53.

For westbound travelers coming from Sawyer County, the biggest change will be the re-routing of Highway 63 from its current 90-degree intersection at Highway 53. Westbound travelers will drive onto a new section of Highway63 that will parallel the Wild River Trail, then will arrive at a roundabout, where they can either access Highway 53's northbound lane or travel across an over pass to access another roundabout and enter the southbound lane of Highway 53.

The full scope of the project begins nearly a mile south on Highway 53 from Mackey Road up to the Highway 5363 intersection.

Temporary stoplights

On Thursday, June 3, WisDOT announced that on Monday, June 14, it would begin oper ating temporary traffic signals on Highway 53 at the two intersections: Washburn County E and Highway 63.

WisDOT says it anticipates that Highways 53 and 63 will remain open to traffic during construction.

Information

More information on the project is available at projects.511wi.gov/us53trego.

The area has been the site of several tragic accidents over the years as vehicles departing from stop signs at Highway E and Highway 63 have driven into the fast-moving northbound or southbound traffic on Highway 53.

For westbound travelers coming from Sawyer County, the biggest change will be the re-routing of Highway 63 from its current 90-degree intersection at Highway 53. Westbound travelers will drive onto a new section of Highway63 that will parallel the Wild River Trail, then will arrive at a roundabout, where they can either access Highway 53's northbound lane or travel across an overpass to access another roundabout and enter the southbound lane of Highway 53.

The full scope of the project begins nearly a mile south on Highway 53 from Mackey Road up to the Highway 53-63 intersection.

Temporary stoplights

On Thursday, June 3, WisDOT announced that on Monday, June 14, it would begin operating temporary traffic signals on Highway 53 at the two intersections: Washburn County E and Highway 63.

WisDOT says it anticipates that Highways 53 and 63 will remain open to traffic during construction.

Information

More information on the project is available at projects.511wi.gov/us53trego.


Commerce
Hayward Farmers Market opens at Lumberjack Bowl

"It's awesome!" said Gloria Sheehan, on Monday, June 7, at the Lumberjack Bowl at the corner of Highway B and Hall of Fame Drive.

Nearby more than 20 vendors were setting up stations around the perimeter of the grounds for the opening day of the Hayward Farmers Market at this new location. Formerly the market had been located near the former Northern Lakes Co-op building off Highway 63 on the city's south side. "There's a lot of anticipation about this site," said Sheehan, who along with Beverly Thompson, is co-manager of the market. "And we won't be in full swing here for another two weeks, when we have 30 vendors and there will be more vegetables available. It's still early in the growing season and the only things available are items like lettuce, mushrooms, kale and spinach."

"It's very exciting," Thompson added. "We have a lot of expectations with many new vendors and opportunities."

The Lumberjack Bowl is the iconic site of the Lumberjack World Championships (LWC) in late July and where, on the east side, Fred Scheer's Lumberjack Shows are held during the summer. Besides these events, along with ongoing log roll training, the bowl is largely unused during the year.

The idea of moving the Farmers Market to the Lumberjack Bowl arose during a 2019 Placemaking effort that looked at creating multiple uses for various strategic sites around the city.

The American Birkebeiner Ski Foundation (ABSF), which manages the grounds and LWC, was supportive of moving the farmers market to the Lumberjack Bowl, which in 2018 received congressional support to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

For Adam Horowitz of Mason, this is the first year he has participated in the Hayward Farmers Market and he was excited to sell from the historic Lumberjack Bowl.

"Last year I participated in the farmers markets in Ashland and Washburn, but this year I'm just going to be here in Hayward," he said.

Horowitz, who owns Amanita Acres: Fiber and Flower, Wool and Plants, said he is impressed by the organization of the Hayward market.

Vendors were selling everything from vegetables, mushrooms, pickled kimchee, homemade signs, spices, bakery goods, homemade flutes, meats, extracts, brines and more, including hot barbecue brisket sandwiches from a food truck.

Customers began arriving before the 1 p.m. opening and soon the parking lot near Highway B was filled, with some resorting to parking outside the back fence on Lake Drive.

Vendors were soon passing over goods for cash and the new season was in full swing.

To celebrate the move to a new location, the Hayward Chamber of Commerce arrived for a ribbon cutting and to offer a First Dollar of Clear Profit plaque to Sheehan and Thompson.

Information

The Hayward Farmers Market, located in the Lumberjack Bowl at 15670 County Highway B, is open from 1 to 6 p.m. Mondays from June to September.

Vendors interested in participating this season should email HaywardFarmersMarket@yahoo.com or call (715) 558-3906.


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