Racing for a Remedy Profile of a Killer

Dr. Desiree Marshall, director of Autopsy and After Death Services for University of Washington Medicine, examines the preserved heart of a person who died of COVID-19 related complications, as she works in a negative-pressure laboratory, Tuesday, July 14, 2020, in Seattle. Seven months after the first patients were hospitalized in China battling an infection doctors had never seen before, countless hours of treatment and research are providing a much closer look at the new coronavirus and the lethal disease it has unleashed. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

NEW YORK (AP) — What is this enemy?

Seven months after the first patients were hospitalized in China battling an infection doctors had never seen before, the world's scientists and citizens have reached an unsettling crossroads.

Racing for a Remedy Profile of a Killer

This 2020 electron micrsocope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 particle isolated from a patient, in a laboratory in Fort Detrick, Md. Coronaviruses, including the newest one, are named for the spikes that cover their outer surface like a crown, or corona in Latin. Using those club-shaped spikes, the virus latches on to the outer wall of a human cell, invades it and replicates, creating viruses to hijack more cells. (NIAID/NIH via AP)

Racing for a Remedy Profile of a Killer

FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017 file photo, Shi Zhengli works with other researchers in a lab at the Wuhan Institute of Virology in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province. On Dec. 30, 2019, Shi, famous for having traced the SARS virus to a bat cave, was alerted to the new disease, according to an interview with Scientific American. By late January, when Chinese authorities walled off the city of Wuhan, where the disease was first diagnosed, it was too late to stop the spread. (Chinatopix via AP)

Racing for a Remedy Profile of a Killer

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. Coronaviruses, including the newest one, are named for the spikes that cover their outer surface like a crown, or corona in Latin. Using those club-shaped spikes, the virus latches on to the outer wall of a human cell, invades it and replicates, creating viruses to hijack more cells. (NIAID-RML via AP)

Racing for a Remedy Profile of a Killer

Dr. Desiree Marshall, director of Autopsy and After Death Services for University of Washington Medicine, prepares samples from the preserved heart of a person who died of COVID-19 related complications, as she works in a negative-pressure laboratory, Tuesday, July 14, 2020, in Seattle. “Each autopsy has the chance to tell us something new,” she says. And those insights from the bodies of the dead could lead to more effective treatment of the living. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Racing for a Remedy Profile of a Killer

Dr. Desiree Marshall, director of Autopsy and After Death Services for University of Washington Medicine, uses a microscope to examine tissues from a person who died of COVID-19 related complications, as she works in her office, Tuesday, July 14, 2020, in Seattle. Autopsies reveal “what the virus is actually doing” inside patient’s bodies, says Marshall. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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